High-Paying Jobs That Are Here To Stay

High-Pay Jobs With Staying Power

Check out five lucrative careers that should have staying power for many years to come.

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Are you looking for a source of livelihood that pays well and has ample opportunity for growth? Good news - we've compiled a list of jobs that meet both criteria.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, these jobs have median annual salaries above the national median for all occupations, which is $35,080. Plus, they have faster growth than the average rate of 11 percent.

So keep reading to find out which high-pay careers could be worth pursuing for the foreseeable future.

Job #1: Market Research Analyst

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Median
Annual Salary
$60,800
Top 10%
of Earners
>$114,250
Bottom 10%
of Earners
<$33,490

With consumerism being essential to our economy, market research analysts are becoming more important every day. In this career, you would monitor and forecast sales trends and gather and analyze data about consumers, competitors, and market conditions, says the U.S. Department of Labor.

And because marketing is such a vital part of modern-day business, it's no surprise that this job could offer more opportunities in the future. The Department of Labor predicts that the field will grow by 32 percent from 2012 to 2022.

Why It's Hot: "Companies today are collecting massive amounts of data in order to analyze it so they can make better business decisions," says John Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., a global outplacement firm.

The information that analysts gather is called big data, and it's a big deal, he says. Analyzing it correctly spells large profits, so paying market research analysts well is seen as good investment, says Challenger.

Next step: Click to Find the Right Business Administration Program.

How to Get Started: You'll usually need a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field, says the Department. Many analysts have degrees in statistics, math, and computer science, or backgrounds in business administration, social sciences, or communications.

Job #2: Registered Nurse

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Median
Annual Salary
$66,220
Top 10%
of Earners
>$96,320
Bottom 10%
of Earners
<$45,630

Here's a profession with a very healthy prognosis. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment for registered nurses is projected to grow by 20 percent from 2012 to 2022.

As a registered nurse, you'd spend your days giving medicines and treatments to patients, educating them on how to get or stay healthy, and performing diagnostic test results, says the Department of Labor.

Why It's Hot: This is one job that you can't outsource, so nursing is here to stay, says Challenger.

With the big changes in health care, including expanded coverage, and the aging of our population creating more need for medical procedures, he says that it's no wonder that nursing is a growing and well-paying profession that is needed nationwide.

Next step: Click to Find the Right Nursing Program.

How to Get Started: There are three typical paths you can take to pursue a nursing career, says the Department of Labor: A bachelor's or associate's degree in nursing or a diploma from an approved nursing program. You would also need to be licensed.

Job #3: Dental Hygienist

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Median
Annual Salary
$71,110
Top 10%
of Earners
>$96,690
Bottom 10%
of Earners
<$47,880

So far, there's no app that cleans your teeth. It's one thing we have to do up close and personal with a dental hygienist. And according to the U.S. Department of Labor, there will be more of them in the future: the occupation is expected to grow by a whopping 33 percent from 2012 to 2022.

Of course, dental hygienists do more than clean patients' teeth. In this role, you would check for gum disease, take x-rays, and educate patients on oral hygiene, says the Department of Labor.

Why It's Hot: "Dentists are hiring more and more dental hygienists to do some of the routine work that they would normally do. This allows them to see more patients and build their practice," says Susan Heathfield, a management consultant and writer of About.com's Guide to Human Resources.

"In addition, people are realizing that dental health is a good indicator of overall health, so that will keep demand high for this profession in the future," she says.

Next step: Click to Find the Right Dental Hygiene Program.

How to Get Started: You typically need an associate's degree in dental hygiene to pursue this career, according to the Department. And while state requirements vary, all states require dental hygienists to be licensed.

Job #4: Computer Systems Analyst

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Median
Annual Salary
$81,190
Top 10%
of Earners
>$125,460
Bottom 10%
of Earners
<$50,290

Try to name a business that doesn't rely on a computer system in some way. If you're stumped, that's the point. Maybe that's why the U.S. Department of Labor says this profession will grow by 25 percent from 2012 to 2022.

In this profession, you would design computer systems to help an organization operate more efficiently, says the Department of Labor. You would also be responsible for consulting with managers, researching emerging technologies, and conducting tests.

Why It's Hot: With the amount of data collected by companies on everything from buying trends to social media habits, computer systems analysts are at an all-time high in demand, says Charley Polachi, partner at Polachi Access Executive Search, a company that places high-tech talent.

The information that's collected by companies, known as "big data," is incredibly valuable to their businesses, and computer systems analysts play an important role in that, says Polachi. They make sure businesses have the proper computers and databases to gather, store, and retrieve big data efficiently, he says.

Next step: Click to Find the Right Computer Science Program.

How to Get Started: You would commonly need a bachelor's degree in computer or information science for this profession, but it's not always a requirement. Some employers hire analysts with liberal arts or business degrees along with skills in information technology or computer programming.

Job #5: Personal Financial Advisor

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Median
Annual Salary
$75,320
Top 10%
of Earners
>$187,199
Bottom 10%
of Earners
<$33,190

When you think about a good future, money is probably a top concern. Perhaps that's why the U.S. Department of Labor reports that the employment of these professionals is expected to increase by 27 percent from 2012 to 2022.

As a personal financial advisor, you would research investments such as stocks, bonds, and other financial instruments in order to recommend the right ones for clients, says the Department of Labor. You'd also help clients plan for big life events like education expenses and retirement.

Why It's Hot: A major driving force behind this job's growth is the baby boomer population, says Nicole Williams, LinkedIn's career expert. Pensions are becoming a thing of the past, leaving people responsible for their own retirement.

And with the population aging and entering retirement age, there will be more demand for personal financial advisors, she explains.

Next step: Click to Find the Right Finance Program.

How to Get Started: You would typically need a bachelor's degree to pursue this job, says the Department. While there is no required major, a degree in finance, economics, accounting, business, mathematics, or law is good preparation for this career.

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